Working Dogs


These images of working dogs (which should never be confused with "Bench" or "Show" dogs), are much valued by many primary producers. When handling stock (both sheep and cattle), these dogs are capable of doing the work of 2 or 3 men, they work from sunup to sundown, 7 days a week - and love doing it. Many of the dogs on this page were photographed while competing in major trialling events - some of them at National level.

These images of working dogs (which should never be confused with "Bench" or "Show" dogs), are much valued by many primary producers. When handling stock (both sheep and cattle), these dogs are capable of doing the work of 2 or 3 men, they work from sunup to sundown, 7 days a week - and love doing it. Many of the dogs on this page were photographed while competing in major trialling events - some of them at National level.

Dog working against the tide
With the tide is much easier
This is called "backing up" - only way to move past the sheep without climbing through dozens of legs
This sheep thinks it  has the upper hand
Another tight squeeze
Dog never lets the sheep out of his sight
More backing up
Still more backing up
What is known as "The eye" - a power indicator
Pushing the sheep out of a loading ramp
Doing a quick about turn while backing
Under instruction while "backing"
Dog had just pushed the sheep over the ramp during competition
Dog at speed (probably retrieving a breakaway sheep)
This is "Connie" doing what she does best - persuasion at close quarters
Dogs like a ride now and then
Small mob of sheep just back from being used (in trios) as competition fodder
Some handlers are very vocal with their dogs
beginning of a confrontation
The near sheep is probably the "leader"
You can tell by the beligerant facial expression
A case of follow the leader
The dog is probably saying "You and what army!"
Another very vocal handler
Hows that for brakes - and eye contact held at all times
Confrontation - start of a 3 image series
Take 2.  The dog is having second thoughts
The dog seems to have recovered, but watch the right foreleg of the sheep - about to stamp - this is a very pushy animal!
Starting the pup at an early age.  Ducks are not as dangerous as a great big sheep.
My good mate Ben Page getting to know one of his new pups
Ben talks to every one of his dogs each night after feeding