Lake Farina and surrounds



This is a series of images from the Lake Farina area, some 5Km North West of the Farina homestead, and on the Farina property.

It can only be accessed by prior appointment with management who are contactable at farinastation@bigpond.com or (08) 8675 7790.


The terrain appears to be a mixture of a white and clear quartz and pegmatite, containing plagioclase on the flats, Black rock (possibly magnetite) higher up and with salt deposits becoming more common as the lake itself is approached. The (sometimes white), and yellow hues all the way through to purple are all a form of ochre - previously used by Australian Aborigines as a paint for ornaments and body painting. Further consultation with a geologist is required to confirm the structure and contents of the deposits in this area.

Many of the hills include the near black rock that adds a dramatic contrast when present with the white quartz and ochres.
When I visited, a number of small springs fed very salty water down from the adjacent higher country to the lake bed, but the water rapidly disappeared after running out onto the lake flats.

Many of the presented images were captured with a very long (960mm effective), stabilised lens which was on this trip, hand held (in quite blustery conditions. The long lens enabled me to photograph features that otherwise would have been impossible. Had I moved closer, I would have lost the elevation that was required for the captures. The use of this lens also explains the excessive shortening that is apparent in a number of the images.

Some of the images here were made more recently with a different group of (Olympus) cameras and their associated lenses. The newer technology enabled all photographs to be made without use of tripods, yet still delivering improved clarity of the end product.

This is a series of images from the Lake Farina area, some 5Km North West of the Farina homestead, and on the Farina property.

It can only be accessed by prior appointment with management who are contactable at farinastation@bigpond.com or (08) 8675 7790.


The terrain appears to be a mixture of a white and clear quartz and pegmatite, containing plagioclase on the flats, Black rock (possibly magnetite) higher up and with salt deposits becoming more common as the lake itself is approached. The (sometimes white), and yellow hues all the way through to purple are all a form of ochre - previously used by Australian Aborigines as a paint for ornaments and body painting. Further consultation with a geologist is required to confirm the structure and contents of the deposits in this area.

Many of the hills include the near black rock that adds a dramatic contrast when present with the white quartz and ochres.
When I visited, a number of small springs fed very salty water down from the adjacent higher country to the lake bed, but the water rapidly disappeared after running out onto the lake flats.

Many of the presented images were captured with a very long (960mm effective), stabilised lens which was on this trip, hand held (in quite blustery conditions. The long lens enabled me to photograph features that otherwise would have been impossible. Had I moved closer, I would have lost the elevation that was required for the captures. The use of this lens also explains the excessive shortening that is apparent in a number of the images.

Some of the images here were made more recently with a different group of (Olympus) cameras and their associated lenses. The newer technology enabled all photographs to be made without use of tripods, yet still delivering improved clarity of the end product.